Star Inductees

Frank Levine

In July of 2009, Frank Levine established a world track record in the 5,000 meter race at the USA National Track & Field Championships held in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. He was 95 years old. Five years earlier, at age 90, he set a world record for the 3,000 meters in Landover, MD. Both records still stand…. Read more »

Larry Brown

Simply put, Larry Brown is one of the most successful basketball coaches, college or pro, of all-time. He is the only head coach to lead teams to an NBA title (Detroit 2004) and an NCAA Championship (Kansas 1988). He is also the only coach in history to lead eight different NBA teams to the playoffs…. Read more »

Benny Bass

The diminutive Benny Bass was pound-for-pound one of the most bruising boxing champions of the 20th century, with more than two-thirds of his 176 victories coming by way of the knockout. Born in Kiev, the capital of the Ukraine, the 5 ft.1 in. Bass won two world titles within the span of 25 months. He… Read more »

Max Patkin

Max Patkin, to millions of Americans, is known simply as the “Clown Prince of Baseball”. His appearance as an underfed scarecrow, with 185 pounds spread out over a 6’3″ frame and his rubber-like face dominated by his nose, give Patkin the natural funny appearance of a true clown, which he has used to entertain millions… Read more »

Sylvia Wene Martin

Sylvia Wene Martin is known as one of the greatest women ten pin bowlers in history. A winner of numerous bowling crowns, she was the first woman ever to rack up three perfect or 300 games in sanctioned competition. She rolled her first perfect game in March 1951. Almost nine years later, in December 1959,… Read more »

Cliff Bayer

In the world of inter-collegiate and international fencing, being chosen as a member of an Olympic team is the absolute pinnacle of the sport. Cliff Bayer, of the University of Pennsylvania has been so honored twice. The Wharton MBA and fencing superstar competed for the US in both the 1996 and 2000 Olympics. In addition,… Read more »

Eddie Gottlieb

Born and raised in South Philadelphia, Eddie Gottlieb was known as the “Mogul” of basketball. He was one of the pioneers of the sport, helping to develop it to national prominence. A founder of the National Basketball Association, he was the first promoter to use the doubleheader as part of the program in basketball. He… Read more »

Judy Auritt Klein

Judy Auritt, a graduate of West Philadelphia High School, was an AAU Junior National and Middle Atlantic States Swimming Champion and an NCAA record holder for Penn State University and the University Of Pennsylvania in the 1940s. She held Middle Atlantic Championships and resident and championship records in 50 yard freestyle, 100 yard freestyle and… Read more »

Don Cohan

The first Jew to be a member of the United States Olympic Team in Sailing and first one to win an Olympic medal, Don Cohan picked up sailing in 1967 at age 37. Within three years, Cohan was competing in top Soling and Dragon-class regattas from Sweden to Tasmania; within five, he was reveling in… Read more »

Dolph Schayes

Widely regarded as the first modern basketball forward, Dolph Schayes is best known in Philadelphia as the first coach of the Philadelphia 76ers, following the team’s move from Syracuse in 1964. Two years later, he coached the 76ers to the NBA Title and was named NBA Coach of the Year. A distinguished college career earned… Read more »